Every September the gauchos in the state of Rio Grande do Sul Brazil mark a 10-year civil uprising with a free music, dance and food festival

On 20 September each year, Rio Grande do Sul, the most southerly state in Brazil bordering Uruguay and Argentina, celebrates the Farroupilha (Ragamuffin) Revolution, a civil uprising that began in 1835 when the state fought for independence from the rest of the nation. Despite the support of Italian revolutionary Giuseppe Garibaldi, the gaucho-led revolt ended in 1845 with surrender, and Rio Grande do Sul remaining part of Brazil.

Despite the defeat, the conflict is a source of regional pride, with partying across the whole of the state, although it’s in the capital Porto Alegre where the action really happens. For most of September, thousands of people camp out in the city’s Harmonia Park, recreating traditional gaucho lifestyles at the Farroupilha Camp.

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Source: The Guardian

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